Stanislav Volný

* 1929  

  • "Regarding the wardens - of course they have certain regulations that they must obey, but I can’t say I would experience any kind of humanity from them. There were only two such cases as far as I remember. We have been talking about my case on the cell openly. There were not only murderers, but also others. Then one day some Lt picked me up on the cell and took also another man from Telnice town and told us, that we will go out to sweep the floor in the hall. I thought that was weird. Why would we clean the floor? He told us: ´You start over here and you go and start sweeping on the other side.´ But he still stood by my side. I couldn’t figure what is going on here. So I was sweeping the floor and was very cautious too. And when the other man turned his back on us, this LT whispered to me: ´Look, you shouldn’t be talking about our authorities like that on the cell. It is not the right time yet.´ I realized that they hear every single word we say there. So this was the only time when I could say that there are nice people in the prison even though they wear a uniform."

  • "Frankly, my opinion is that if we managed to move the Sudeten Germans out of here because they wanted to establish the millennial imperium here, no matter if they were guilty or not, we moved them anyway. So I don’t know how we should have dealt with people who were saying: ´For ever and never otherwise with the Soviet Union, ´ shouldn’t have those been displaced as well? Or those who hurt the others etc?"

  • "The boy ran in, of course, and unyoked the horses before I got to the garden. I had to go to his backyard, because somebody put the joists on his backyard by mistake. I asked him what that is supposed to mean and he told me: ´If your father got four years in Jachymov prison, I will arrange eight years for you.´ He really shouldn’t have said that. There used to be a fence 170 centimeters high, but I haven’t seen that anymore. If someone would tell me today: ´Hey, Slava, jump over it´, I wouldn’t know how, but back then all I focused on was the boy. As I was approaching toward him he prepared a crop that he held with the metal part pointing out on me and got ready. But I couldn’t stop anymore. He smashed the crop and by some coincidence I managed to grab it. He didn’t want to let go so I dragged him down on his knees, took his crop, broke it into four pieces and beat him up with it. Of course he was bleeding, because I didn’t have mercy. Then his wife appeared there and started to throw the wooden logs on me. I stood up and started to chase her too, because I was being furious. She ran into the village and began to shout: ´Volny tried to kill the chairman of the LPG, help.´ And it didn’t take too long, of course, before the police came. All kinds of different units came. They started to question who and how...I felt the pressure from allover me. For a while it really looked like they will give me eight years in prison. But one of the officers suggested: ´If you leave the village, we’ll forget about the whole case.´"

  • "So all of my acting like you could read about in here started in the period of time when my father has been arrested in 1952. After he came back from the Jachymov prison and told me about how they treated him there... my father has been arrested by Gestapo (The former secret state police - translation’s note) already in1939 in Petchkarna. And when he told me that they didn’t treated him here as bad as in Jachymov prison, something really grew inside of me. That’s why every since that I felt an aversion against the regime. When someone introduced himself on behalf of the regime it was like you would try to scare me with a devil. It just was there inside of me. From that time I never did anything right for them. I won’t tell you all the things I used to do, because some of it it’s really nasty. When I realized how they have twisted the paragraphs during the Mr. Hučín trial in 1967 and in 1976 and so on, I didn’t like it a bit, because I knew, they might use the same paragraphs against me also even today. So I still better keep certain things to myself. We can’t be hundred percent sure yet, that we got rid of the Bolshevik."

  • "Among others I also said that I don’t want the Soviet army here, that I don’t wish for them to be here with us and those, who want them here shall take them in their homes and shall go to work to support them themselves. I also suggested that to prevent the boredom while staying in their homes, they shall let them fuck their own wives. And that was just the moment when the prosecutor yelled at the secretary: ´Do not write down about the accused intention to displease us.´ so I guess I was displeasing not only the Russians, but also Mr. Prosecutor."

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    Litoměřice, 11.06.2007

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I used to work since I was ten Thank God I’m able to work until these days I couldn’t live without work I finish one think and I’m already thinking about another two

S. Volny in 2007
S. Volny in 2007

Mr. Stanislav Volný was born on March 1st 1929 in Jinočany village in Kladno region in central Bohemia. After the end of WWII, his family moved to Tasov village near Ústi nad Labem where they obtained a farmstead. His father has been arrested in Jáchymov town prison during the 50s. Mr. Volný got married in 1950, and when his first son was born he bought his own farm house in Tasov village. Aside from working on the farm, he worked also in the chemical factory in Ústi nad Labem, which made him so-called part-time farmer. He has been arrested for short time in 1949 and in 1956. But his troubles at work and chicane by the chairman of the LPG and the local communist party culminated in 1960. Instead of going to jail again he lost his farm and was forced to move away. After this he worked mainly in the woods. Then in 1986, he was charged with seditious libel against the socialistic regime. His three sons immigrated to Sweden after this, but the youngest one returned very shortly after their escape. Mr. Stanisla Volny´s emigration appeal has been denied though and his attempt for an escape was also unsuccessful. He resides now in Ústi nad Labem and takes care of his restored property.