Radislav Bušek

* 1929  

  • “When the Germans were there, the working squad, they just left, and they went there to watch the Czech gendarmes and Daddy managed to get caught there and there was a problem, because they were Czechs. They did not want to tell on him, but they were afraid that if dad said it, as it was already during the Heydrich dark times, so they would shoot them all, so they all risked keeping quiet, and they let him go. And after the war, I do not know, maybe the letters were here somewhere... or I saw them at my brother, where they were talking and thanking each other. Yeah, they were corresponding after the war, and they thanked each other that it was so moving that they had endured that none of them was actually shut up and shot.”

  • "At a time when it was close to August or when it was supposed to be August when they were supposed to come, all this one of our units had been raised and sent us to Mladý Boleslav. And they did so that the departments were not in their own place, so they could not resist, because it would fly with aircraft and spare works and with the people and that's all, everything else is here, stayed in Olomouc. Well, so we were experiencing the whole disaster there, we knew it was bad. But they were enterprising guys, they were arguing if they would not fly to Austria with those helicopters. And then it burst, everyone denied it, nobody admitted it, but someone just said it. So then there were all of us, because among us there were those who were not afraid of what they were openly reporting to the spring, or they were the first ones, so they were the first ones in the row that they were liquidating."

  • "There was another order that buses and trucks will come to us and take us to the station in Kluž and we would take a train to Bohemia. So from Romania we travelled through Romania, across Yugoslavia, via Austria to Vienna and from Vienna to Brno. And in Brno there was the final station, and from there everybody went to see their relatives and so on. Well, we went to Motyčín, because my mother had a sister, who was a widow with two small boys, so we were there in April, do not recall exactly. This way we travelled all through Europe for a month."

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    Olomouc, 19.03.2018

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    nahrávka pořízena v rámci projektu The Stories of Our Neigbours
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I saw the burning Lidice

19.jpg (historic)
Radislav Bušek

Radislav Bušek was born on March 15, 1929 in Motyčín near Kladno. Here his two older brothers Všemil and Vlastimil came to this world. Mrs Bušková came to give birth to her three sons to Bohemia from Transcarpathian Ukraine, where her husband - the children´s father - left due to work after the World War 1. Duting WW1 the witness´ father fought in the Czechoslovak legions in France. After the war he was transferred as a financial guard within the Czechoslovak State Administration to the Transcarpathian Ukraine. During the World War 2 he belonged to active members of the Czechoslovak resistance. The consequences of the August 1968 events also affected Radislav Buček professionally. In connection with the so-called Husák‘s examinations he showed sympathy with Dubček‘s reform policy and was  thrown out of the army due to political reasons. At present, the witness is still an active pensioner. He enjoys his family, with which he is in regular contact, and is dedicated to his interests - choir singing, accordion play and hiking.